Penmon Priory, Anglesey.

I visited Penmon Priory during the August 2020 bank holiday weekend. I knew it would be busy, but it was packed, with the car parks completely full. Parking was £3, even if you did not go down to Penmon Point. I only went to look at the historical ruins, yet I was charged £3 to park only to find the church and Dovecot closed. I understand that whoever runs the car parking at Penmon wants to make as much money as possible. However, they could at least ensure that places are open if they insist on charging.

I have made a video below of my visit for a look inside the ruins that were open.

Penmon Priory is thought to have been established by St. Seiriol, as early as the 6th century.
St Seiriol’s Well

The Holy Well is fed from a spring behind the church. The well is located in its own walled garden and is a very tranquil place. The waters were believed to have healing powers and would be visited by the sick in the hope to be cured by the waters.

The dates as to when the well was used seem unclear. However, the brick structure that surrounds the well dates from about 1710.

St. Seiriol church

The 12th century stone church and tower date from around 1140 and is a fine example of Romanesque architecture.

Flagstaff Quarry

You can see the derelict Flagstaff Quarry buildings from the road. However, getting to them is quite a trek. They are on private land and can only be viewed from the fence along the beach.

From the limited amount of information available online. It appears that there was a small quarry and pier at this location prior to 1874. However, in 1888, William Baird & Co commenced operations at the quarry, which supplied fluxing stone to their steelworks in Glasgow.

Thanks for reading.

Roche Abbey Ruins.

August 7th 2020.

Roche Abbey was founded in 1147 and housed Cistercian Monks. (The Order of Cistercians are a Catholic religious order of monks and nuns that branched off from the Benedictines and follow the Rule of Saint Benedict. Also called ‘white monks’ due to their light colour robes).

At its peak in around 1175, there were approximately 50 monks, 100 lay brothers and servants. Roche Abbey was suppressed in 1538 when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries.

Today the site is managed by English Heritage. Entry is £5 for adults and £4.50 for concessions. As of August 2020, you must book online before visiting, this also includes EH members.

There is only one interpretation board on site. When staff scan your ticket, they ask if you want to buy a guide book for £4.50. I think this is a little bit wrong, I understand that the extra money goes towards the upkeep of the site. However, some more boards would be nice, rather than trying to get people to buy the book.

Thanks for reading.

The one interpretation board on site.
The Gatehouse
I also have a YouTube channel, I would really appreciate if you could like my video and subscribe to my channel :).

Tupholme Abbey, Lincolnshire, England.

Tupholme Abbey was a Premonstratensian monastery, founded between 1155-65.  It was relatively small, of up to 12 canons and had limited endowments in the county of Lincolnshire. Along with other Lincolnshire monastic sites, Tupholme was involved in the wool export trade.

From the time of St Augustine’s mission to re-establish Christianity in AD 597, to the reign of Henry VIII, monasticism formed an important facet of both religious and secular life in the British Isles. Settlements of religious communities, including monasteries, were built to house communities of monks, canons (priests), and sometimes lay-brothers, living a common life of religious observance under some form of systematic discipline. It is estimated from documentary evidence that over 700 monasteries were founded in England.

The abbey was dissolved in 1536, after Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. The property was granted to Sir Thomas Heneage of Hainton. Thereafter the site was occupied by a country house, demolished around the beginning of the 18th century and replaced in the 19th century by cottages and a farmhouse, which were also dismantled in 1986.

What remains today is a mixture of the abbey and the post-medieval buildings.