The Remains of RAF Woodhall Spa

Today, parts of the old RAF base at Woodhall Spa make up the Thorpe Camp Visor Centre. However, if you look around the area, there are other hidden remains of the old base.

Before my visit, I found some blog posts and watched some YouTube videos on the derelict parts of the base. However, when I got to Woodhall Spa, some of them have now sadly been demolished (video below).

However, if you know where to look (some locals told me) there are still some buildings that remain.

Thorpe Camp Museum

Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire.

https://thorpecamp.wixsite.com/visitorscentre

Thorpe Camp, officially known as the Thorpe Camp Visitor Centre, is part of the former Royal Air Force barracks for RAF Woodhall Spa.

The buildings that today make up the Centre were formerly part of the No.1 Communal Site, which was built in 1940. In 1998, the camp was made into a visitor centre by the Thorpe Camp Preservation Group.

Woodhall Spa and the surrounding area has a long history connected to the RAF. The 97, 619, 617 (Dambusters) and 627 Squadrons were based at RAF Woodhall Spa.

For a more in-depth look around the Thorpe Camp, please watch my video below.

Thanks for reading.

Can anyone tell me what these posts are?

Before you visit, check their website for opening days and times as these have changed due to COVID.

Crash Site of the Boeing RB-29A [F13-A] Superfortress 44-61999 “Over Exposed”.

This has been on my list of places to visit for a while. It was a sunny Sunday morning and so I decided to take the 40 minute drive to the Snake Pass to finally go and have a look.

There are two parking spots off the Snake Pass. I parked at the Doctors Gate but the more direct walking route is accessed from a little further along the Snake, towards Manchester.

There were quite a few other walkers out, due to the poor visibility, I missed the turn off from the main footpath to head towards toe crash site. It isn’t signposted, but I believe the pile of stones along the footpath is where you are meant to turn off.

On the 3rd of November in 1948, the United States Air Force Boeing RB-29A Superfortress 44-61999 set off from RAF Scampton and was heading to the United States Air Force Base at Burtonwood near Warrington.

Visibility was poor and the crew thought that they had been flying long enough to have crossed the hills and so they started to descend. The plane hit the ground, setting on fire and killing all 13 crew members on board.

Below are a series of pictures and a short video of my visit.

Thanks for reading.

I also have a YouTube channel, I would really appreciate if you could like my video and subscribe to my channel 🙂

South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum, Doncaster.

https://www.southyorkshireaircraftmuseum.org.uk/

Amongst many other sectors, the heritage sector, especially small independent museums have suffered greatly due to COVID, so it is nice to be able to try and support as many as possible now they are re-opening.

The South Yorkshire Aircraft Museum is quite hidden away at the back of the popular Lakeside area of Doncaster. The buildings once formed part of RAF Doncaster, which the museum took over when they were vacated by Yorkshire Water.

There is loads to see and some great displays. They don’t just have aircraft, they also have lots of other history on the military.

It is definitely worth a visit. Parking is free, there is plenty of space for social distancing and they have put one way systems in place.

Below are a few pictures from my visit. Thanks for reading.

Hawker BAE
Westland Seaking HAS.6 XV677
A few aircraft on display outside.
Hangar displays
Hangar displays
Wartime Store

As of 2020, admissions were:

Adult £6.50

Children (5-16) £3

Senior Citizen £5.50

Family £15