Rhyolite Ghost Town, Nevada, USA.

On the way to Beatty, Nevada sits the once booming town of Rhyolite.  Today, there is nothing much left of Rhyolite apart from a few ruins, the bottle house and the old station.  Nevertheless, it remains one of my favourite ghost towns.  I first visited Rhyolite back in 2016, and then returned in 2017. Unfortunately, in the space of a year, I noticed more graffiti and the old truck near the bottle house had gone. 

In 1904, Frank ‘Shorty’ Harris and Eddie Cross discovered gold in the nearby Bullfrog Hills.  By 1908, it is said that Rhyolite had a population of around eight to twelve thousand people. Although the mine produced more than $1 million in bullion in its first three years, by 1910, it is estimated that the population fell to just under seven hundred people.  The last Rhyolite resident passed away in 1924.  Many of Rhyolite’s buildings were relocated to the nearby town of Beatty.  The Miner’s Union Hall in Rhyolite became the Old Town Hall and many other buildings were used to construct a school. 

Rhyolite gets a mention in Ian Flemming’s 1956 novel, Diamonds Are Forever.  

Spectreville is a fictional place but there is a Specter Range near Amargosa Valley in Nevada.

The Bottle House (known as Tom Kelly’s Bottle House) was restored by Paramount pictures in January of 1925 for the filming of a silent movie, The Air Mail. For some reason, and I have no idea why, I did not take a picture of the house.

The movie, The Island (2005) starring Scarlett Johansson and Ewan McGregor was partially filmed in Rhyolite as was Six-String Samurai in 1998.

Ruins of the School Building
H.D. and L.D. Porter Store
H.D. and L.D. Porter Store
The Train Depot (privately owned)
Ruins of the John S. Cook and Company Bank Building 
The Train Depot (privately owned)
Ruins of the John S. Cook and Company Bank Building 

Useful Information:

Rhyolite is a mixture of private and federal land.

Entry is free and the ghost town is open 24/7

Remember, be respectful and take nothing but pictures.

Happy exploring!

Anchor Brewing Company, San Francisco, USA.

1705 Mariposa St, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA
https://www.anchorbrewing.com/

I have to admit, I’m not a beer or ale fan and going to Anchor was my boyfriend’s choice.  However, I really enjoyed it.  We were in a small group of about 10 people.  You get to walk around the brewery, see the whole brewing process and learn about how Anchor Steam is made, as well as learn about the history of the company.

The Anchor Art Deco Building.

The Anchor Brewing Company dates back to the 1890s and was the creation of German brewer, Gottlieb Brekle.  In 1965, to save it from closure, Frederick Louis Maytag III purchased the company.  In 1979, Anchor moved to its current location on Mariposa Street.  The building was once a coffee roaster and is a wonderful example of Art Deco architecture.  

Our tour guide was super enthusiastic and from seeing the staff in the factory, it looks like a great place to work.  The tour was $25 but I would say you get that in beer if you want it.  As I’m not a huge beer fan, I only had a taste, but you get to sample a lot of their different beers. The tour talks about their past, where they are now and their vision for the future. As well as how they are trying to keep the history and their methods of brewing alive.  Anchor Brewing is community minded and supports local initiatives as well as California State Parks from the sale of their California Lager.

Grist Mill. This was used until Anchor moved their new location in 1979. The date is unknown, but according to the Anchor website, the design dates it to the late 1800s.
2018 Christmas Beer

Useful Information:

  • Guided public tours every day
  • Approx. 1.5 hours long
  • Tours are $25 per person
  • Beer tasting included
  • Booking is advised
  • Don’t forget your ID

Hardwick Old Hall, Derbyshire, England.

The ruin of the old hall

Bess built Hardwick Old Hall in 1587 on the grounds of her father’s medieval manor house.  Bess intended for both the old and new hall to complement each other.  However, after her death in 1608, the Hardwick estate was passed to her son, William Cavendish who partially dismantled the Old Hall in the 1750s.  

In 1789, the lower rooms were still occupied by the house keeper of the New Hall and a family. In the 19th century lead was removed from the roof leading to the hall’s final demise to a ruin.

Visitor Information

The Old Hall is managed by English Heritage. As of 2019, the hall can only be viewed from the outside but there is a small exhibition and shop. Parking is £5 (free for EH and NT members). The EH website states that entry is £6.80, but there was a sign which said the exhibition was free entry when I visited. I assume when the restoration work is complete, there will be a charge again. The EH website also states that the hall is closed Monday and Tuesday, but as only the exterior is currently viewable, I think as long as the park is open (managed by the National Trust), you can have a walk to the old hall ruins.

Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire, England.

The main entrance to the hall.

Elizabeth (Bess), Countess of Shrewsbury, built Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire as a display of wealth and power.  However, Bess came from modest beginnings.  Her father was not much more than a yeoman, yet Bess was able to climb the social ladder through a string of marriages to wealthy men.

Bess was first married at the age of 14 and widowed at 15.  Her second marriage was to Sir William Cavendish in 1547.  The couple had 8 children together, one of their grandchildren was William Cavendish, who built Bolsover New Castle.  When Cavendish died in 1557, Bess inherited his fortune.  She then married Sir William St Loe in 1559, on his death in 1565, Bess became one of the richest women in England.  In 1568, Bess married George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury and the richest man in England. They remained married until his death in 1590.  

In 1590, Bess began the building of Hardwick Hall.  The house was completed in 1597 with Bess living there her death on the 13th February 1608, aged 81.

The kitchen
The hall and garden
The gardens
The front lawn

Useful Information for visitors

The hall managed by The National Trust.  Entry to the house and garden is £15 for an adult and parking is £5, garden only entry is £7.50.  The house is open from 11am to 5pm from Wednesdays to Sundays. The garden is open daily from 09:00 – 18:00 and the park is open from Park Dawn to dusk.  There is also a shop and restaurant.

Hardwick Old Hall is managed by English Heritage but it is currently closed for renovation work.

Zzyzx, San Bernardino County, California, USA.

Formerly Soda Springs

I find myself dawn to old places that have fascinating back stories and Zzyzx is no exception. 

Located off Highway 15 in California, Zzyzx is home to the California State University Desert Studies Centre.  However, this has not always been the case.  It was once home to a health spa called Soda Springs.  The spa owner, Curtis Howe Springer was born in 1896 in Birmingham, Alabama.  He worked as an insurance salesman and then a radio evangelist, calling himself “the last of the old-time medicine men.” However, it seems that Springer had no formal medical training.  After making some money through preaching and selling homemade homeopathic remedies, Springer used the money to file a mining claim in the Mojave Desert, which he called the area, Zzyzx.

Springer built a hotel and health spa on his desert land, heating the water with pumps and claiming that the site offered miracle cures.  Soda Springs ran for almost 30 years with people believing they were receiving natural medical treatments.  In 1969,  several customers made complaints and the American Medical Association subsequently investigated Springer, labelling him the “King of the Quacks.”   He was convicted in 1974 of fraud for which he served prison time.  Springer died in 1985 at the age of 88 in Las Vegas.

Only a few of the old buildings remain today but nevertheless, they are a reminder of the obscure story of Curtis Howe Springer and how one man managed to con people for the majority of his life.

Tips for visiting.

We just stopped by on route to Los Angeles. The place was quiet with maybe one more person having a look around. I assume you can walk around at your leisure as we did, but if you want to make sure before visiting, contact the university. http://nsm.fullerton.edu/dsc/desert-studies-center

Happy exploring.

Sutton Scarsdale Hall, Derbyshire, England.

The derelict shell of Sutton Scarsdale Hall
The derelict shell of Sutton Scarsdale Hall

The last time I visited Sutton Scarsdale was approximately a year ago. The first thing that I noticed on my return, was that nothing had changed in terms of the conservation work that is going on. Understandably you can’t go inside the ruin due to health and safety but it feels like English Heritage have forgotten about this place.

The hall was a Baroque style mansion built for the 4th Earl of Scarsdale in the 1720s. In 1919, a descendant of the famous Sir Richard Arkwright (I intend to do some articles on Sir Richard in the future) purchased the hall, subsequently selling it to a company of asset strippers. Unfortunately this was common practice in the 20th century. I’ve visited many shells and grounds of beautiful halls that were torn down and either shipped overseas, or simply just demolished. Errwood Hall in the upper Goyt Valley, Darley Hall in Derbyshire and Broomhead Hall in Sheffield are just a few.

Changes in social conditions in the 20th century brought about the destruction of many large halls. The upkeep of the buildings was incredibly costly as well as income tax and death duties contributing to loss of wealth. The website Lost Heritage documents 1,998 houses that have been demolished in England.

http://www.lostheritage.org.uk/lh_complete_list.html

Like Sutton Scarsdale, Broomhead hall was shipped to America. Some of the interiors from Sutton Scarsdale are on display at the Museum of Art in Philadelphia. Along with some at the Huntington Library in California after being used as a set for a film, Kitty, in 1934.

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/sutton-scarsdale-hall/history/

Taken from through the fence

Tips for visiting:

The site is managed by English Heritage and is accessed down a small road. The EH website states that opening times are Summer Daily 10am – 6pm, Winter Daily 10am – 4pm. Entry is free and there is a small carpark.

Happy exploring.

Bolsover Castle, Derbyshire, England.

The 17th Century Playboy Mansion

Bolsover Castle was built to lavishly entertain guests and is often called the playboy Mansion of the 17th century.

Bolsover Little Castle and the Fountain Garden

Bolsover Castle can be traced back to the 12th century, but that it not what stands today.  The image above is of Bolsover Little Castle, which was built by  Sir William Cavendish in the 17th century as a retreat for entertaining guests. One of which was Charles I. To the right of the image is a statue of Venus in the Fountain garden.

The Stables

Sir William Cavendish loved horses. The building in front is the stables and indoor Riding School, which William Cavendish built to house the many exotic horses that he imported from overseas.

The Star Chamber

A study by the University of Sheffield suggests the Star Chamber was used as an auditorium for aristocratic plays and country house masques.

Colourful wall tapestries
Ceiling of the Heaven Room

The image above was painted in 1619, and is a depiction of Christ’s ascension into heaven surrounded by angels.

The kitchen ovens
The ruins of the Terrace Range

Unfortunately, only the Little Castle and the Stables remain intact today. William Cavendish also built the Terrace Range which overlooks Vale of Scarsdale. It was left to go to ruin by William’s son, Henry.

The Terrace Range
The remains of a fireplace inside the Terrace Range

Tips for visitors.

Bolsover Castle is managed by English Heritage.  The cost of entry for an adult as of 2019 is £11.80 and a child is £7.10.  If they have a special event on, there is an additional charge even if you are an English Heritage member.  On busy days the small carpark gets full, there is additional parking opposite the main car park and there is another carpark if you pass the castle to your right, but the entrance is quite concealed and I didn’t notice it until I had parked up and was walking back to the castle.  There is street parking but like anywhere, this is not ideal.  I parked on the street and someone parked about an inch from my bumper.  Luckily I had left enough room in front of me to get out.  In the summer the castle opens from 10am until 6pm, in winter, hours are reduced. 

Happy exploring.